PROTEIN INTAKE - PART 1

PROTEIN INTAKE – PART 1

I get a lot of questions about Protein intake, most commonly I am asked: how much is required, how much of it can I consume in one sitting, and probably the most interesting one is whether too much protein is bad for you. In part 1 of this article I will tackle the “how much protein do I need” question.

How much Protein do I really need? Is there such a thing as “too much protein”?

A Google search will result in all sorts of different answers and comments with many from “highly qualified nutritionists”. Some responses relate to the dangers of excess protein consumption. Other recommendations are based on grams per day for a specific age group, regardless of whether the individual is a 250lb Power Lifter or a 250lb Couch Potato. Which obviously makes no sense.

The first question we must always ask ourselves when it comes to feeding is “Does it make Evolutionary Sense?”. After all, until roughly 10,000 years ago, humans were nomadic hunters and gatherers. They would practice intermittent fasting (though, not on purpose), and when they finally found game, they would feast on it until they were full, eating not only the muscle of the animal but even more so the organs, rich in fats and proteins, which are nutrients fundamental for the two objectives of our nomadic ancestors, survival and reproduction.

I cannot envision a hunter saying “whoa, I had way too much protein today!”

Protein is the building block of our whole body. Muscles, tendons, organs, sinew, ligaments, nails, hair. You name it and it is built by proteins. There is no scientific evidence that there is such a thing as too much protein, nor that an excessive consumption of protein will tax your kidneys, your heart, or lead you to type 2 diabetes, (yes, this is also stated on some websites!).

Exactly how much protein you need will depend on your activity level and what type of training you do, if any. There isn’t a clear-cut answer to the question. As with anything, all is in context. With most of my trainees, I recommend at least 2.5g/kg/d to 3.5g/kg/d of lean body weight.

That’s a lot of protein so chances are that you will need to supplement with protein powder, be that whey, casein or both.

Proper protein intake is fundamental for recovery, compensation and overcompensation following a strenuous training session and must be the “default” macronutrient for any athlete. Backfill the rest of your diet with Carbs and Fats.

As the body cannot transform excess protein into fat, (it just cannot, it just doesn’t work that way), if in doubt stay on the high side, because, really, there is no downside!

Recent Articles

ASS TO GRASS SQUATING

In any training environment the Ass to Grass squat looks awesome, but is it the best way to squat?

Read Article

EXERCISE, TRAINING AND PRACTICE - WHERE'S THE DIFFERENCE

What is exactly is the difference between exercise, training and practice? 

Read Article

ESSENTIALS OF BARBELL PROGRAMMING - PART 4

The Novice, the Intermediate ad the need to train based on your training.

Read Article

WHY YOU SHOULD BE DEADLIFTING

Picking things up off the ground is part of human heritage. It has been with us since the dawn of man and is still part of our every day lives. 

Read Article

ESSENTIALS OF BARBELL PROGRAMMING - PART 3

In ESSENTIALS OF BARBELL PROGRAMMING - PART 3, We highlight the difference between the One Step Theory, also known as the principle of Supercompensation, and the Two Step Theory, also known as the Fitness-Fatigue Model. Which one is correct?

Read Article

ESSENTIALS OF PROGRAMMING - PART 2

The topic of this blog will begin where I left off, at the most basic of Programming principles; which is linear progression, or the ‘One Factor Theory’. This is where I start off most of my trainees, and it usually proves successful, at least for a while, if progress stalls, there is a reason. Understanding the reason is not always as easy.

Read Article

Want Personal Advice?

Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.